• This season, we celebrate...

    Yule

    In olden times, Yule (also called Winter Solstice, Midwinter’s Day, Mother Night or Return of the Sun) traditionally marked the shortest day and longest night of the year; a time when the Sun returned after the winter’s cold and darkness. In Old England, womyn left their lamps burning all night at Midwinter. It was later custom for a single candle to burn in the window on Christmas Eve, lit by the youngest child in the house. In Sweden, it was traditional for the oldest daughter in every household to wear a candlelit wreath on her head, make coffee and gingersnaps, and wake her parents announcing: “Saint Lucia invites you to breakfast!”

  • This season, we celebrate...

    All Hallow’s Eve

    Also known as Old Hallowmas, Hallow E’en and the Day of the Dead, this creepy night preceding All Hallows Day (1 November) was considered by the Celts to be one of the most important days of the year, representing a mid-point (Samhain, or ‘summer’s end’), when the dark half of the year commenced. Young people would put on strange disguises and roam about the countryside, pretending to be the returning dead or spirits from the Otherworld. Pumpkins and turnips were hollowed out and carved to look like protective spirits, for this was a night of magic and chaos. In the southern hemisphere, April 30 is the ‘correct’ date we ought to be celebrating Hallow E’en — one of the most magical nights of the year, when the veil between worlds is considered to be at its thinnest, mists rise and trees become bare and skeletal!